The Bodleian Library (Oxford)

The Bodleian Library is one of the oldest libraries in Europe, and it is also the main research library of the University of Oxford. The first founder of the Bodleian Library was Thomas Cobham, the bishop of Worcester. He founded in the fourteenth century. Between 1435 and 1437, Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester donated great collection of manuscripts. The room for containing the great collection of manuscripts is well-known as Duke Humfrey’s Library. In the late sixteenth century, the library was in a period of decline. Sir Thomas Bodley donated among of his books, so when the library re-opened in 1602, it named “Bodleian Library”.

The Bodleian Library occupies five buildings near Broad Street: Duke Humfrey’s Library to the New Bodleian of the 1930s. Today, the Bodleian also includes several off-site storage areas:

  • Alexander Library of Ornithology
  • Chiness Studies Library
  • Education Library
  • Health Care Library
  • Japanese Library
  • Latin American Centre Library
  • Law Library
  • Library of Commonwealth and African Studies at Rhodes House
  • Music Faculty Library
  • Oriental Institute Library
  • Philosophy Faculty Library
  • Social Science Library
  • Theology Faculty Library
  • English Faculty Library
  • History Faculty Library
  • Radcliffe Science Library
  • Rewley House Continuing Education Library
  • Sackler Library
  • Sainsbury Library at the Said Business School
  • Sherardian Library of Plant Taxonomy
  • Social and Cultural Anthropology Library
  • Taylor Institution Main Library
  • Taylor Bodleian Slavonic and Modern Greek Library
  • Vere Harmsworth Library (Rothermere American Institute)
  • Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine Library

The great intruduction video of Bodleian Library I found on YouTube

 

Thank you for reading.

 

 

 

Reference:

Bodleian Library – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (n.d.). Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved May 23, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodleian

 

 

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